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20120929
20121007
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
when ambassador stevens lost his life he was torteured. >> i have reports that the body was torteured. it is not a pleasant thing to talk about. and seals that were there were not part of the security force and on a different mission and the seals run to the sound of fire. they did their job and duty and were great americans and unfortunately it was not a spontanous attack when ambassador rice said it was a spontanous even and our relationship with israel and never been better. that is misleading. our relationship with israel is strained . they are preparing to do a unilateral attack and our position over seas is dangerous and fragile. >> brian: we understand that intercepts show groups were talking to each other and bragging after the killing of four americans, including the ambassador and two navy seals and it makes it seem that an operation is under foot and it seems there is a special operation to go get these goys. would you support that? >> absolutely. you have to show leadership and policy of appeasement of apology doesn't work. our friends over seas understand strength and ame
a lot of hot button issues. >> yeah. the most recently retired justices were john paul stevens went out at 90. david souter 69, sandra day o'connor 75. is there a tradition of when justices usually retire, be it age, or time served? >> well, they're like most human beings. a lot of factors weigh in. there is -- there was a tradition where justices would tend to retire during the term of a president that was at the same party that appointed them. but we know neither justices souter nor stevens did that. they were both republican employees and went out during president obama's term. life circumstances can drive retirement decisions. so it's really not scientifically predictable or politically predictable. >> do you see any most likely candidates if another seat opens up under president obama? >> you know, i think if president obama, first of all, justice ruth bader ginsburg i think the pressure to replace her with another woman appointee would be enormous. we've made progress in getting a third of the court female and i don't think president obama or any president would want to go backwar
communications between ambassador stevens and the state department. >> at a time most americans would want to rally around our country at the death of four americans serving our country instead we've had this bizarre response which only leads me to believe, number one, there was gross negligence or incompetence involved or this administration doesn't want all of us to realize that libya may now be a failed state if the fbi agents who are well-trained can't even make it into benghazi. >> with growing calls for ambassador susan rice resign over her comments that benghazi was a demonstration spun out of control had strong defense this weekend by senior obama cam main advisor. >> i was shocked to see representative king attack ambassador rice because she was acting on the intelligence given her to the intelligence community. to say she should resign, she is one of the most remarkable splendid public servants that is thoroughly irresponsible. >> reporter: two final observations about axelrod's comments. number one, susan rice went way beyond the assessment here given by the director of national
clearly in libya. there were the extremists who killed chris stevens, an appalling murder of somebody who had actually done his best for the libyan people. but then you then have thousands on the street protesting against his killers and demanding action be taken. so i think the more i look at the world today, i think in a way a more relevant struggle to a lot of countries than what i would call traditional left versus right politics is the open minded versus the closed minded. and the open minded see globalizations as an opportunity. they want an open society, an open economy, a society where you tolerate and respect people, a different faiths and cultures and then the closed minded who really have a view that if you don't accept my view then are you an alien or an enemy. i think that is the battle that is going on and in the end, i think it's important always, and i always say this to people in america to realize-- realize that for all the pictures of extremist that you see in people burning the american flag and protesting and so on, you also then have a lot of people who wanted same t
of september 11th, after this had happened, but before he knew that ambassador stevens had been killed, came out, criticized the statement that had come out of the cairo embassy about the -- about the demonstrations there. then got a huge amount of criticism. as the facts began to pile up against obama, the romney campaign stayed somewhat silent, and has still to this day not made a lot of the problems that developed. >> the debate is built entirely around foreign policy. if romney doesn't take advantage of that platform to raise questions, again, poke holes in the president's arguments -- >> greta: why isn't he now? this is coming from the super pac. >> i think the romney campaign thinks it can wait that long, at least some people in the romney campaign, think it can wait, and want to do his foreign policy right before that debate, so there's some bringing together of these arguments. i think the time is now. you had governor romney asked about this last week on his plane. you know, how has the administration handled it? he said, look, it's too early to judge it. that's not the right answer
stevens and three other americans were killed in that attack. cnn intelligence correspondent suzanne kelly joins me live from washington. did intelligence agencies really not have enough formation, or were they covering up parts, as some are suggesting? >> that's a great question, and i think what we're starting to see now is a little bit behind the curtain, if you will, with the intelligence community coming out with this very unusual statement really about what it knew. although it's not nailing down exactly the timeline. now, you have to remember in those first 24 hours after this attack, things were coming in, they were initial assessments and the intelligence community is basically saying look, guys, we know that initial assessments are sometimes wrong because you just haven't gathered enough information yet. but let me read to you what shawn turner said. he's the director of communications for the office of the director of national intelligence, the president's top intelligence adviser here. as we learn more about the attack, we revised our initial assessment to reflect new informati
. the evolution of what might be the truth of what happened regarding the killing of ambassador chris stevens and three others at the consulate there in libya. now the director of national intelligence is weighing in. is he giving cover to susan rice for the administration's wobbling evolution on the truth? >> we may see how this argument is now about to play out. right? we had a debate on the show a little while ago. fascinating because i was hearing from mark lavine, radio talk show host. argument from the left that this intelligence may have been muddled from the beginning and they were making their way to uncover it this is what the director of national intelligence is now saying it was on us, basically, not the white house. read. this in the intermeet adaftermath there was information that led us to assess that the attack began response stainously following protests earlier that day at our embassy in cairo. we provided that assessment to the white house and men's of congress who used that information to discuss that attack publicly and provide updates as they became available. through th
, he recounts a conversation with former verizon ceo ivan steven berg and valerie jarrett from the white house and here is ivan seaton berg talking to valerie jarrett according to bob woodward. with all due respect we will be here when you are gone for climb a perfect example that he said so you have to realize that this very progressive agenda and this once-in-a-lifetime malt meant for this world can be lost because guys like me can hunker down and wait you out. >> guest: i've heard the same things. i have heard at the end of the day the president likes to appear like he is getting input from the business community but he really doesn't act on that input. because he has an ideology of the solutions that are needed for this economy and that is really where he focused, rather than speaking to business people saying okay here is what the demand picture looks like. here is what we need to ensure that we will you know put more money into the economy. i think there is a real debate right now and division frankly in this country about the solutions to the way forward. i think the bus
is to introduce steven heydemann. steve is the senior adviser for middle east initiative. he taught at colombia. he is published and directed if the senator for democracy and civil society at georgetown university. steve is terrific asset to the institute. the project is one that it driven by syrians. with assistance technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute in a sister constitution in germany. it's very important that these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations. things that are handed down from the united states typical don't work all that well. and so we are very pleased that you're all here. i hope you have lots of questions. and steve, if i can turn this over to you. >> thank you very much. thank you very much for opening us this morning. and let me add my welcome to jim's we're delighted to see you here this morning. it's going to be a very, very interesting conversation about syria after assad and the challenges of managing a post assad transition. as jim mentioned, this event this morning is in many ways the cull min nation of a project that has been
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)